Goosebumps

Goosebumps: The Cuckoo Clock of Doom

The Cuckoo Clock of DoomThis just might be my favorite Goosebumps book. It is well-written, it is suspenseful, and it is interesting. Maybe it’s because I read a really terrible entry in the series right before reading this book, but I was surprised by how much I enjoyed The Cuckoo Clock of Doom.

The cover and title made me think and hope that this book would play with time travel, and it did, -ish. The main character, Michael, messes with the bird in a cuckoo clock his father brings home, and finds himself going backwards in time years at a time. He must find a way to stop time from moving back anymore before his existence is erased.

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Goosebumps: The Barking Ghost

The Barking GhostThe Barking Ghost is an entry in the series I had seen at book fairs and stores when I was a kid and always wanted to read, but never had the opportunity to buy (until now!). The cover is actually one of my favorites in the series, and a ghost dog seems like it would make for an interesting plot device. Spoiler: it didn’t.

Funny enough, this is one of R. L. Stine’s least favorite Goosebumps books. (Has he READ Chicken Chicken?) I wonder if that had any weight on the price of this book at Amazon. Both of the books he listed as least favorites (the other one being Go Eat Worms!) were only $1.99. I’m glad I didn’t spend more than that on this.

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Goosebumps: Night of the Living Dummy

Night of the Living DummyAfter reading some of the Fear Street books, I’ve been reminiscing a lot about R. L. Stine’s other popular series, Goosebumps. I was obsessed with the series when I was younger and read a large chunk of the series. I decided to read one of my favorite installments to rediscover what I loved. Surprisingly, this book held up really well! Why not go through this series as well?

Night of the Living Dummy was great because it dealt atmospheric and subtle scares. The dummy didn’t come alive until after more than halfway through the book, and I thought that was an interesting and creative decision. The story relied on the natural creepiness of ventriloquist dummies in the same way that the original Child’s Play made the viewer question if Chucky was really alive.

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